Category: Profession

Wearables/Algocracy working bibl

As is my way, I’ve been working with a few folks on another shared bibliography – this time on wearables and algorithmic culture.

I’m pleased that our reading list includes of number of important pieces/books by women and I thought I’d share it with others.

 

Blogs/Forums

 

Articles/Books

Abbate, Janet. Inventing the Internet

Bennett, Jane  Vibrant Matter

Bogost, Ian Cathedral of Computation

Bouk, Dan How our days became numbered: risk and the rise of the statistical individual

Carpo, Mario, The Alphabet and the Algorithm

Chun, Wendy H. K., Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics (MIT, 2006)

Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (MIT 2011)

Crawford, Kate – lots of articles…coming soon.

Digital Echoes lecture

Danaher, John “Rule By Algorithm”

Mager, Astrid, “Algorithmic Ideology: How Capitalism Shapes our Search Engines”, Information, Communication and Society, Vol. 15(5), 2012: 769-787.

Lippold, Cheney, John, “A New Algorithmic Identity: Soft Biopolitics and the Modulation of Control”, Theory, Culture & Society, November 2011, Vol. 28(6): 164-181.

Striphas, Ted Rule by Algorithm and  “The Archive of Algorithmic Culture”

Walker-Rettenberg, Jill. Seeing Ourselves Through Technology

Wegenstein, Bernadette Getting Under the Skin: Body and Media Theory

Weigel, Moira “Fitted”Zylinska, Joanna and Sarah Kember, Life after New Media (MIT 2012)

On Haptics in Particular

Smart baby nursery — about mimo,” http://mimobaby.com, accessed: 2015-10-26.

Collier, Emotional expression. Psychology Press, 2014

J. Linden, Touch: The Science of Hand, Heart, and Mind. Penguin, 2015.

]  M. W. Kraus, C. Huang, and D. Keltner, “Tactile communication, cooperation, and performance: an ethological study of the nba.” Emotion, vol. 10, no. 5, p. 745, 2010.

E. Williams and J. A. Bargh, “Experiencing physical warmth promotes interpersonal warmth,” Science, vol. 322, no. 5901, pp. 606–607, 2008.

M. Ackerman, C. C. Nocera, and J. A. Bargh, “Incidental haptic sensations influence social judgments and decisions,” Science, vol. 328, no. 5986, pp. 1712–1715, 2010.

Montagu, Touching: The human significance of the skin. Columbia U. Press, 1971.

Smith and K. MacLean, “Communicating emotion through a haptic link: Design space and methodology,” International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, vol. 65, no. 4, pp. 376–387, 2007.

N. Bailenson, N. Yee, S. Brave, D. Merget, and D. Koslow, “Virtual interpersonal touch: expressing and recognizing emotions through haptic devices,” Human–Computer Interaction, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 325–353, 2007.

Rantala, K. Salminen, R. Raisamo, and V. Surakka, “Touch gestures in communicating emotional intention via vibrotactile stimulation,” International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, vol. 71, no. 6, pp. 679–690, 2013.

Salminen, V. Surakka, J. Lylykangas, J. Raisamo, R. Saarinen, R. Raisamo, J. Rantala, and G. Evreinov, “Emotional and behavioral responses to haptic stimulation,” in Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ser. CHI ’08. New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2008, pp. 1555–1562. [Online]. Available: http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1357054.1357298

Raisamo, R. Raisamo, and V. Surakka, “Comparison of saltation, amplitude modulation, and a hybrid method of vibrotactile stimulation,” Haptics, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 517–521, 2013.

S. Stevens, Psychophysics. Transaction Publishers, 1975.

C. Wilson and M. Morioka, “The effect of vibration magnitude on equivalent sensation contours at the thenar eminence of the hand,” 44th UK Conference on Human Responses to Vibration, pp. 149–159, 2009.

Kozel, Closer: Performance, Technologies, Phenomenology. MIT Press, 2007.

F. A. Geldard, “Adventures in tactile literacy.” American Psychologist, vol. 12, no. 3, p. 115, 1957.

 

Other related

QS as Alternative Big Data

Wired’s “Know Thyself”

Pew on self-tracking

Algorithmic Culture Reading List at Microsoft Research

Governing Algorithms reading list

Jamie Mcdonald  – Algorithmic Studies critical survey

No More Excuses

Male colleagues whom I respect, read, think with and sometimes disagree with: it is time. Time to see gender equity (at the very least) and our much touted inclusivity be realized. As a feminist I think dissensus is necessary and disagreement can be productive. I don’t want to hide our many differences. But it is time to stop behaving as if there aren’t any/enough/enough good women working in the fields that fall under our “big tent.” There are no more excuses for having an all-male panel, an all-male editorial board,  an all-male DH qualifying exams reading list, an all male anything.

Hearing that people have a hard time coming up with examples of women who program, women who have published in DH, women to be on grant or advisory boards, women who can be invited as featured or plenary speakers – some of us have gathered together and made a set of resources. There’s the Build a Better DH Syllabus, Build a Better List of Code Experts, and now Build a Better Panel. You have over 100 280+ women from across the globe, representing a range of disciplinary and methodological approaches. We have all manner of intersectional identities and ranks represented in our lists. Soon you’ll have info on where you can contact those folks in order to invite them and learn from them. We will be building a speaker’s bureau and you can find more information there as well.

There are no more excuses. You know we are here and that we do damn fine work. Going forward, all-male panels can only be construed as a choice, not an issue of ignorance. We have been busy building the communities we want to see within DH,  and now we’ve taken time from our research, our teaching, our lives to pull together information for you – now it’s your turn to do your part.

Build a better DH syllabus

Prompted by a discussion on twitter (ht to Whitney Trettien and Daniel Powell) today (2/18/2015) about the inexcusable absence of women’s work from DH syllabi, I’m creating a space for collecting resources (the initial set up is derived from the DHSI course on Feminist DH that I teach each year with Liz Losh – if you’re not on here, it’s not because I don’t know and love your work – I just had precisely 6 minutes to get this rolling). Feel free to add yours in the comments and we’ll make this a running bibl of bad-ass DH and critical digital culture scholars. I’ll also note that there are already some great resources via dhpoco and GO:DH.

NB: I’m squeezing in additions as I’m able. This is currently thematically organized and that’s about it.

I’ll be adding in materials from Jentery Sayers’ syllabi shortly, in the meantime, you can check them out here and here.

You might also want to check out Carly Kocurek’s Teaching Theory and Technology

and Adeline Koh’s crowdsourced Race and DH

Code, Feminist Critiques of Code Culture

Wendy Chun, “Enduring Ephemeral, or the Future Is a Memory”

– selections from Programmed Visions “Invisibly Visible, Visibly, Invisible” and “On Sourcery and Source Code”

Annette Vee, “Text, Speech, Machine…” in Computational Culture

“Coding Values in Enculturation”

Tara McPherson, “U.S. Operating Systems at Mid-Century” in Race After the Internet

Lisa Gitelman, Always Already New

Barad, Karen. “Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Vol. 28, No. 3. (1 March 2003), pp. 801-831

— Posthumanist performativity : Toward an understanding of how matter comes to matter. In Deborah Orr (ed.), Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (2006).

Work and ideas that came up in the ensuing discussion: about work in conversation with Barad:

Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska, Life After New Media, MIT Press, 2012.

Anne Balsamo, Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work, Duke UP, 2011.

Tara McPherson’s work on Scalar, discussed in a forthcoming article in Difference. (A talk version is here:
http://mith.umd.edu/podcasts/tara-mcpherson-scholarship-beyond-database/ ).

–Micha Cardenas and Zach Blas, “Imaginary Computational Systems, Queer Technologies, and Transreal Aesthetics”

Micha Cardenas et all, in http://transreal.org/media-n-journal-2013-caa-conference-edition/ and http://www.e-fagia.org/digievent/2011/tx/michaElle.html

Maria Fernandez, Faith Wilding, and Michelle M. Wright, Domain Errors, (Autonomedia, 2003)

Caludia Reiche and Verena Kuni, eds. Cyberfeminism: Next Steps (Autonomedia, 2004)

Kim Christen-Withey’s work on Mukurtu as anti-imperialist approach to database design

“Fuzzy logic:” looking at measures of information as the continuum between 0 and 1 rather than the binary,

–connected to French Feminism: Kristeva, Cixous, Irigiray, Wittig.

–see work of Margaret Homans, introduction and opening chapter in Bearing the Word (Chicago UP, 1989).

    Play, Feminist Game Studies

 
Mary Flanagan, Critical Play: Radical Game Design (Introduction, Ch. 2. “Playing House” (17-62) and and Ch. 7 “Critical Computer Games” (222-249).

Janine Fron, Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie, and Celia Pearce, “The Hegemony of Play”

Bonsignore, E.,* Hansen, D., Kraus, K., & Ruppel, M.* (2013). Alternate Reality Games as platforms for practicing 21st -century literacies. International Journal of Learning and Media

Kraus, K. (2011). “A counter-friction to the machine”: What game scholars, librarians, and archivists can learn from machinima makers about user activism. Special commissioned issue on machinima. Journal of Visual Culture 10(1), 100-112

Liz Losh, “#Gamergate 101” date: 10/17

Nina Huntemann (co-ed), Gaming Globally: Production, Play and Place and Joystick Soldiers: The Politics of Play in Military Video Games.

— (associate producer of the film) Joystick Warriors: Video Game Violence and the Culture of Militarism
— (produced and directed) Game Over: Gender, Race and Violence in Video Games

    Discipline/Access, Feminist Critiques of Technoculture

Radhika Gajjala, Cyberselves: Feminist Ethnographies of South Asian Women and of Cyberculture

the Subaltern: Weavings of the Virtual and Real.
Anne Balsamo, “Feminism for the Incurably Informed,” Ch. 6 in Technologies of the Gendered Body

N. Katherine Hayles, “Prologue: Computing Kin,” in My Mother Was a Computer “Prologue” and “Toward Embodied Virtuality,” in How We Became Posthuman

Lisa Nakamura “Indigenous Circuits” in American Studies Quarterly

Morgan Currie, “The Feminist Critique: Mapping Controversy in Wikipedia” in Understanding Digital Humanities, ed. David Berry (2012)

Heather Froehlich and Michele Moravec, Postcolonial Digital Humanities | Gender and the DHPoco Open Thread: A Corpus Analysis

Jasbir Puar, Homonationalism gone Viral (youtube video)

Johanna Drucker on Humanist Approaches to Graphical Display and her feminist book arts

    Program, Feminism and Theories of the Media Apparatus

 
Lisa Parks on drone vision: “Zeroing In: Overhead Imagery, Infrastructure Ruins, and Datalands in Afghanistan and Iraq” Ch. 14 in The Visual Culture reader, 3rd Ed., ed. Nicholas Mirzoeff, Routledge 2012

Lucy Suchman, “Preface,” “Introduction,” “Interactive Artifacts,” “Plans,” and “Situated Actions” Plans and Situated Actions: The Problem of Human-Machine Communication

“Human/Machine Reconsidered,” published by the Department of Sociology, Lancaster University at

Genevieve Bell and Paul Dourish “Contextualizing Ubiquitous Computing,” in Divining a Digital Future

Murray, Janet Horowitz. Hamlet on the Holodeck: The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace. New York: Free Press, 1997

Blair, Ann. Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information before the Modern Age. New Haven Conn.: Yale University Press, 2011. Print.

Nina Lykke, Randi Markussen, and Finn Olesen, “There are Always More Things Going On Than You Thought!”: Methodologies as Thinking Technologies: Interview with Donna Haraway” Bits of Life: Feminism at the Intersections of Media, Bioscience, and Technology.

Kraus, K. and Levi, A.* (Eds.). (2012). Rough Cuts: Media and Design in Process. [Online collection of essays and artifacts]. MediaCommons: The New Everyday. [Collection includes 23 contributors; edited, curated, and published by Kraus and Levi with introduction written by Kraus]

Lisa Snyder on 3D Modeling

Miriam Posner’s Blog, especially “Commit to DH People, Not DH Projects”

    Archive, Feminist DH Projects

 
Alex Juhasz, The Views of the Feminist Archive

Kate Eichhorn, The Archival turn in Feminism

Katherine D. Harris, Forget Me Not! The Rise of British Literary Annuals, 1823-1835, a literary and cultural history of early British literary annuals. Ohio University Press, forthcoming June 2015.

— “TechnoRomanticism: Creating Digital Editions in an Undergraduate Classroom.” Journal of Victorian Culture 16:1 (2011 April): 107-112. Invited by journal editor, James Mussell.

Julia Flanders & Jacqueline Wernimont, “Feminism in the Age of Digital Archives” Tulsa Studies of Women’s Literature

Watch: Amy Earhart on obsolescence in feminist DH projects,
“Recovering the Recovered Text” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ui9PIjDreo

Bethany Nowviskie “What Girls Dig”

Trettien, Whitney Anne. ‘A Deep History of Electronic Textuality: The Case of English Reprints Jhon Milton Areopagitica’. Digital Humanities Quarterly. 7.1 (2013)

Kraus, K. (2013). Picture Criticism: Textual Studies and the Image. In Julia Flanders and Neil Fraistat (Eds.) Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship. Cambridge: Cambridge UP. 3.

Kraus, K. (2011). Prim Drift, Copybots, and Folk Preservation. In Megan Winget and William Aspray (Eds.) Digital Media: Tech

Michelle Moravec, Unghosting Apparitional (Lesbian) Histories

Corpus Stylistics

Fischer-Starcke, B. ‘Keywords and Frequent Phrases of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice A Corpus-Stylistic Analysis’. International journal of corpus linguistics 14.4 (2009): 492–523.

Lutzky, Ursula. ‘Why and What in Early Modern English Drama’. Middle and Modern English Corpus Linguistics: a Multi-dimensional Approach. Amsterdam: John Benjamins (2012): 177–190.

— and Jane Demmen. ‘Pray in Early Modern English Drama’. Journal of Historical Pragmatics 14.2 (2013): 263–284.

Marchi, Anna, and Charlotte Taylor. ‘If on a Winter’s Night Two Researchers… A Challenge to Assumptions of Soundness of Interpretation’. Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis across Disciplines 3.1 (2009): 1–20. Print.

Mahlberg, Michaela. ‘Corpus Linguistics and the Study of Nineteenth-Century Fiction’. Journal of Victorian Culture 15.2 (2010): 292–298.

— Catherine Smith, and Simon Preston. ‘Phrases in Literary Contexts: Patterns and Distributions of Suspensions in Dickens’s Novels’. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 18.1 (2013): 35–56.

Selections from*:
Pahta, Päivi, and Andreas H. Jucker. Communicating Early English Manuscripts. Cambridge University Press, 2011.

Meurman-Solin, Anneli and Jukka Tyrkkö. Principles and Practices for the Digital Editing and Annotation of Diachronic Data. Studies in Variation, Contact and Change in English. Volume 14. Helsinki, Finland: 2013 http://www.helsinki.fi/varieng/series/volumes/14/

Nevalaienen, Terttu and Susan Fitzmaurice. How to Deal with Data: Problems and Approaches to the Investigation of the English Language over Time and Space. Volume 7. Helsinki, Finland: 2011 http://www.helsinki.fi/varieng/series/volumes/07/

Gonzalez-Diaz, V. and Hodson, J. and Auer, A.. Language and Literary Style. Linguistics and Literature. John Benjamins, Amsterdam: 2012